inahill

Copywriter
www.inahill.no

explore-blog:

What do Americans stress about? A visualization of the results from a 2014 study by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health.
To tackle the top three stressors, see how to live with presence in the age of productivity, how to worry less about money, and how our minds can heal our bodies.

explore-blog:

What do Americans stress about? A visualization of the results from a 2014 study by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health.

To tackle the top three stressors, see how to live with presence in the age of productivity, how to worry less about money, and how our minds can heal our bodies.

— 2 weeks ago with 566 notes

cats-in-kreuzberg:

Some of the research on enneagram and MBTI correlations. All of the above tables come from enneagram authors and/or research studies. In case you want something a bit more reliable than Wikipedia and/or message board polls where people are changing their type on a weekly basis. (Not that there’s anything wrong with being indecisive about one’s type, but it does muck with the data a bit.)

— 2 weeks ago with 12 notes
freundevonfreunden:

A Tumblr Discovery: Contrast and Clarity 
Sit back, relax and scroll through this genius selection of contrasts and clarities, set up by our very own Katie Hill, member of the Moresleep team.Hilarious, marvelous, elegant and shocking, the images tell more than thousand words. See for yourself here.

freundevonfreunden:

A Tumblr Discovery: Contrast and Clarity 

Sit back, relax and scroll through this genius selection of contrasts and clarities, set up by our very own Katie Hill, member of the Moresleep team.

Hilarious, marvelous, elegant and shocking, the images tell more than thousand words. See for yourself here.


— 2 weeks ago with 56 notes
"

‘And how are you mad?’
Now comes the time for psychological marriages.

We should wonder:
- how are they mad
- how can one raise children with them
- how can one develop together
- how can one remain friends

"
— 2 weeks ago
"We want to be like the friend you have that always comes to you with new and exciting music, knowing that you’ll love it, even if you may never have considered listening to this kind of sound before." (via RA: Label of the month: Leisure System)

"We want to be like the friend you have that always comes to you with new and exciting music, knowing that you’ll love it, even if you may never have considered listening to this kind of sound before." (via RA: Label of the month: Leisure System)

— 4 weeks ago
a-poster-a-day:

Last year’s posters were about my life. The next 365 days are about You.Please use the submission field here and share your story with me. I’d loveto hear from you.

a-poster-a-day:

Last year’s posters were about my life. The next 365 days are about You.
Please use the submission field here and share your story with me. I’d love
to hear from you.

— 4 weeks ago with 14 notes
Masters of Love: lasting relationships come down to—you guessed it—kindness and generosity.

Throughout the day, partners would make requests for connection, what Gottman calls “bids.” For example, say that the husband is a bird enthusiast and notices a goldfinch fly across the yard. He might say to his wife, “Look at that beautiful bird outside!” He’s not just commenting on the bird here: he’s requesting a response from his wife—a sign of interest or support—hoping they’ll connect, however momentarily, over the bird. The wife now has a choice. She can respond by either “turning toward” or “turning away” from her husband, as Gottman puts it. Though the bird-bid might seem minor and silly, it can actually reveal a lot about the health of the relationship. The husband thought the bird was important enough to bring it up in conversation and the question is whether his wife recognizes and respects that. People who turned toward their partners in the study responded by engaging the bidder, showing interest and support in the bid. Those who didn’t—those who turned away—would not respond or respond minimally and continue doing whatever they were doing, like watching TV or reading the paper. Sometimes they would respond with overt hostility, saying something like, “Stop interrupting me, I’m reading.” These bidding interactions had profound effects on marital well-being. Couples who had divorced after a six-year follow up had “turn-toward bids” 33 percent of the time. Only three in ten of their bids for emotional connection were met with intimacy. The couples who were still together after six years had “turn-toward bids” 87 percent of the time. Nine times out of ten, they were meeting their partner’s emotional needs. * * * By observing these types of interactions, Gottman can predict with up to 94 percent certainty whether couples—straight or gay, rich or poor, childless or not—will be broken up, together and unhappy, or together and happy several years later. Much of it comes down to the spirit couples bring to the relationship. Do they bring kindness and generosity; or contempt, criticism, and hostility? “There’s a habit of mind that the masters have,” Gottman explained in an interview, “which is this: they are scanning social environment for things they can appreciate and say thank you for. They are building this culture of respect and appreciation very purposefully. Disasters are scanning the social environment for partners’ mistakes.” Contempt is the number one factor that tears couples apart. “It’s not just scanning environment,” chimed in Julie Gottman. “It’s scanning the partner for what the partner is doing right or scanning him for what he’s doing wrong and criticizing versus respecting him and expressing appreciation.”

(Source: The Atlantic)

— 4 weeks ago
everypixel:

Don’t Expect by Stefan Sagmeister, photo by Ace Boothby for Tattly.com

everypixel:

Don’t Expect by Stefan Sagmeister, photo by Ace Boothby for Tattly.com

— 4 weeks ago with 4 notes
pieratt:

With @electricobjects

pieratt:

With @electricobjects

— 1 month ago with 48 notes